Trappists, Technology, and the Dictatorship of Relativism:

Part seven in our Lenten series on technology and spirituality. This past weekend, I had the opportunity of leaving home for a retreat at a Trappist monastery, Mepkin Abbey. The monks, though they haven’t taken a vow of silence, speak only when necessary.

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Losing our religion: New research shows the Internet could be making Americans lose faith:

New research has shown a correlation between the rise of the Internet and the decline of Americans claiming religious affiliation.

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officialheadache:

What you put on your blog you put in your soul so be careful out there, son.

“And Death Shall Be No More”: Going beyond Transhumanism for Kids:
Death seems an odd topic for a children’s book, but author Gennady Stolyarov II explains that he wrote his recently released Death Is Wrong to share with kids what he wished he would have learned growing up: that dying is not inevitable, that through science, medicine, and technology, human bein
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“And Death Shall Be No More”: Going beyond Transhumanism for Kids:

Death seems an odd topic for a children’s book, but author Gennady Stolyarov II explains that he wrote his recently released Death Is Wrong to share with kids what he wished he would have learned growing up: that dying is not inevitable, that through science, medicine, and technology, human bein

Continue reading: http://ift.tt/1fRytGl

Technology, Speed, and Power:

Alvin Toffler’s 1970 book, Future Shock, popularized the title phrase and the concept which it named, that technology was responsible for the disorienting and dizzying quality of the pace of life in late twentieth century industrialized society.

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10 Points of Unsolicited Advice for Tech Writers:

Nobody asked me, but here they are anyway. A short list of suggestions and clarifications for pundits, journalists, bloggers, and assorted scribblers who write about technology, in no particular order … 1. Don’t be a Borg.

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Without the Printing Press, Would Inerrancy Be A Question?:

Depending on your background, the term “inerrancy” might be a vaguely familiar idea that means something like “authority” or “trustworthiness” or, conversely, it might refer to an idea invented by fundamentalists that is at best unhelpful.

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The Railing Principle:

Who was that guy—that first guy who thought, “I’m going to use my roof as a second floor”? When did it occur to him that the ceiling over his head could become a new floor beneath his feet? Was he lying in bed in the pre-dawn? Was he staring up at the ceiling with his arm underneath his h

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The internet killed books again:
A few years ago I created a column called “deathwatch” (macabre, I know). Its goal was to track all of the real or imagined ways that we thought media could die.
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The internet killed books again:

A few years ago I created a column called “deathwatch” (macabre, I know). Its goal was to track all of the real or imagined ways that we thought media could die.

Continue reading: http://ift.tt/1fujsKp

On Noise and Meaning:

Part four in our Lenten series on technology and spirituality. This year, I gave up the radio for Lent. It’s not the first time I’ve given it up, but I always find it to be a beneficial experience.

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